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Museum of Archeology
El Paso It's All Good




Current Temporary Exhibits

The Living Mask Making Tradition of the Rarámuri/Tarahumara
Open Through August 31, 2014
Free Admission
 
Guest Curator Kitty Alice Snead’s exhibit of twenty photographs and two videos document and interpret the practice and meaning of daily life and traditional ceremonial customs of the Rarámuri people of Copper Canyon, Mexico. Ms. Snead will be speaking on March 22, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm. For details on her talk see the Event Calendar for March 22. The following color photos by Kitty Alice Snead are included in the exhibit. The black and white photo of Kitty Alice Snead is by photographer Richard Speedy.
 

Monarcho and
Chapeyoko

Chapeyoko
with mask
 
This exhibit and Ms. Snead’s lecture are made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Additional support is provided by the City of El Paso Museum of Archaeology.
 

Kitty Alice Snead
on burro

Chapeyoko mask
worn by dancer
 
The Living Mask Making Tradition of the Rarámuri/Tarahumara, came out of over ten years of contact with the Rarámuri in the Sierra Madre. Ms. Snead worked and traveled for over ten years in Mexico with the ethnologist and Sierra guide “Santiago” James Barnaby who recently passed away in a tragic fire.  Their work and passion has been to study and document the communal rituals and traditional lifestyles of the contemporary Tarahumara peoples.  The building of roads in the region for tourism, logging and renewed mining of minerals is bringing sweeping changes to the people and their lands.
 
Dallas-based Kitty Alice Snead’s career has developed from actress classically trained by the Academy of Dramatic Arts and Baylor University to bilingual teacher and counselor for the Dallas Public Schools to her current passion as an ethnographic photographer and videographer.  In photography, her mentor was Douglas Kent Hall from 1992 until his death in 2008.  She has studied Photoshop and digital printing with Tim Boole from 2009 to the present.
 
Ms. Snead received a grant from the Southwest Center of the University of Arizona in 2008 for a photo essay and ongoing research among the Tarahumara related to chapeon mask production and mask use in the Sierra de Tarahumara region of Mexico. Her most recent photographic exhibits have been in 2013 at both the Wittliff Collection at Texas State University San Marcos, in the Mexico Lindo exhibit and at the Mexican Consulate in Dallas where her FireLight photo collection was on view. Her website is http://kasneadphotographs.com/
 

 
Recent Acquisition – Bear Claw Necklace
 
SILVER, TURQUOISE, AND BEAR CLAW NECKLACE
Milton Tsosie, Navajo
 
Bear Claw Necklace
Bear Claw Necklace
Navajo silversmithing is one of the oldest craft industries in the Southwest.  It is believed they adopted the practice from Spaniards in the 1700s. Over the generations the Navajo have developed a set of skills, design, and talent that is all their own. Navajo silver work is characterized by ornate designs rather than as a setting for precious stones.
 
Donated to the El Paso Museum of Archaeology by John Green
 

 

 


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